Psychiatric Drugs Made Simple – What Therapists Need to Know

2 days 9:30am – 12:30pm 6 CPD hours

Course Brief

This course, delivered by an experienced psychiatrist and practicing therapist, is designed to provide therapists with both knowledge about psychiatric drugs and an appreciation of some of the key debates and critiques. It will also consider the range of ways in which a client taking a psychiatric drug may impact on the therapy process.

The rates of prescribing psychiatric drugs have been increasing for many years now and prescribing is often a first-line response to people experiencing mental and emotional distress. It is therefore becoming more common for therapists to see clients who are taking, or have been recommended to take, a psychiatric drug. This makes it important for therapists to have some knowledge about these drugs, to be aware of their own views and assumptions, and then to have considered how these influence their clinical practice.

This course, delivered by an experienced psychiatrist and practicing therapist, is designed to provide therapists with both knowledge about psychiatric drugs and an appreciation of some of the key debates and critiques. It will also consider the range of ways in which a client taking a psychiatric drug may impact on the therapy process.

Course Objectives:

  • To gain an overview of the conceptual framework from which psychiatric drugs are prescribed, namely the medical model and the link with psychiatric diagnosis.
  • To understand how psychiatric drugs work in the brain.
  • To know the main categories of psychiatric drugs, for example, antidepressants and antipsychotics.
  • To understand which drugs are prescribed for a range of mental disorders.
  • To know about some of the main adverse effects (harms) of psychiatric drugs, and withdrawal symptoms when drugs are discontinued.
  • To understand how a range of physiological effects of psychiatric drugs may impact on the therapy process.
  • To appreciate the potential psychosocial consequences and psychological meanings for clients of taking a psychiatric drug.
  • To have a framework for thinking about when taking a psychiatric drug and receiving therapy at the same time may complement each other and when they may be in conflict.
  • To develop confidence having conversations about psychiatric drugs with clients.

Duration of the course: 2 days

CPD Hours: 6

Time: 9.30 AM - 12.30 PM on both days

Delivery: Live Zoom

Attendance: in person or watching as a recording

This course comes with 14 CPD Hours

This course is suitable for all practitioners who come across this issue in their client work.

This course counts as a follow up training for all SDS Students who have obtained SDS Accreditation in CBT - Level 1, 2, 3 and 4. You accreditation extends accordingly after this training.

It also stands as a stand-alone CPD training.

Course Tutor

Dr Rachel Freeth
M.D., Psychiatrist, Person-Centred Therapist

Dr Rachel Freeth worked as an NHS psychiatrist for over 25 years in a variety of mental health settings. For many years she combined this with working as a person-centred therapist in the voluntary sector but has recently developed a private therapy practice based in Gloucestershire.